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Warner Brothers Discs No Longer Working
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DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantStar Contributorscotthm
Registered: March 20, 2007
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Quoting GSyren:
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I basically take the approach "it is what it is".

Will I be better off knowing which of my old Warner discs are corrupt? They'll most likely be oop so I can't re-buy them anyway.

Actually, many of the old WB discs have been re-released as MOD discs through the Warner Archive if one is inclined to repurchase defective DVDs.

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DVD Profiler Desktop and Mobile Registrantmediadogg
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Registered: March 18, 2007
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It seems Warner should be offering some kind of replacement program. Do they?

Another thought. VUDU disc to digital, if it still exists. If the disc can be read enough to validated, then it is a cheap way to get a digital copy.

Oh, now I see the comment about the Archive.
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 Last edited: by mediadogg
DVD Profiler Desktop and Mobile RegistrantDr. Killpatient
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Registered: May 19, 2007
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Quoting scotthm:
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Quoting Dr. Killpatient:
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You may want to look into backing up your DVD collection to a NAS to protect your investment.

That's worked for the ones that still play.



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1,137 movies on mine plus 44 TV series. 


Quoting DJ Doena:
Quote:
Just keep in mind that hard drives will also fail one day and also that RAID is not a backup.

True that. I use UNRAID for my NAS which if more drives than my parity can protect fail, I only lose the data on the failed drives due to unraid using a split style file system and each drive has it's own file system. But I also have an off-site backup at my brothers and I use Resilio Sync in a Docker on my main NAS to automatically backup any changes to it.
DVD Profiler Desktop and Mobile Registrantmediadogg
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Registered: March 18, 2007
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In my experience, the cost and headache of RAID or any other scheme that messes with the file system has exceeded any potential savings. The price of hard drive storage has fallen so dramatically that now you can afford to have 2 or 3 copies and just keep them in a drawer or safe. No need for expensive enterprise drives. Just make multiple copies on cheap USB drives. Since the backups are not online, the risk of losing all your copies at the same time is virtually zero, assuming you keep them physically separate.
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DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantStar Contributorscotthm
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Quoting mediadogg:
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In my experience, the cost and headache of RAID or any other scheme that messes with the file system has exceeded any potential savings.

I'm putting together a new TrueNAS server consisting of a refurbished Dell T320 and eight 12 TB drives.  This is costing me about $0.063 per usable GB.  If I were to fully utilize all this storage for videos it would cost, on average, about $0.08 per DVD movie, $0.39 per Blu-ray movie, and $1.83 per television season (based on the videos I already have on my existing Plex server.)  You can spend more than that buying shelves for your discs, so I don't consider RAID (or RAID-Z2, in my case) as being particularly expensive.

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DVD Profiler Desktop and Mobile RegistrantStar ContributorAiAustria
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Registered: May 19, 2007
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Not to be misunderstood, I use a FreeNAS array in this scale, but...

This calculation is extremely optimistic:
- 8x12TB RAID-Z2 delivers a little bit more than 50TiB usable Space (80% usage limit, TB/TiB gap, RAID-Z2 overhead)
- The server consumes 200+ Watts of electrical energy, which produces a mentionable annual bill
- configuring, maintaining - and most of all - extending the storage space of a FreeNAS system is not trivial
- most of us around here collect discs because of the extras and presentation of the content; a compression to 1.2GB for a DVD or 6.2 GB for a BD is completely unrealistic
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 Last edited: by AiAustria
DVD Profiler Desktop and Mobile Registrantmediadogg
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Yeah, I made my comments based on past years when hard drive cost per GB was at least 5x of what it is now. I couldn't afford the most expensive RAID controllers, so the bottom line was that in order to increase my reliability, I had to buy super expensive enterprise drives. Finally, after many episodes of days of nail biting rebuilds after a RAID crash, I decided to abandon RAID in favor of multiple cheap copies.

So now I have my media server with all 2021 / 2020 media, my main backup server with about 40 - 60 TB spinning, and my offline archival server with over 60TB. Every day, I Robocopy sync the media machine with the online server, and every couple of weeks I power on the offline server, and the same software brings it up to date. As my library grows, I replace smaller drives in the servers and just store the retired drives on the shelf as another level of backup. I must have 3 or more copies of my favorite media, and I have a custom inventory program.

Since I gave up on RAID, I have not had any more of those days long rebuilds. I use the RAID board just for neat management of the hardware, and Windows Server Essentials 2012 to manage the shared folders and PC backups.

Edit: I admit that in those days, I made the mistake that lots of people do, of conflating the availability run-time objectives of RAID with that of asset protection (backup). Redundancy during runtime is not equivalent to having a backup copy of the data. I learned that the hard way, early on. That was another reason I decided that asset protection was most important to me. Since consumer media is archival in nature, it doesn't matter if a few videos or movies are offline for a bit of time, while you replace a failed drive and copy over from a backup.
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 Last edited: by mediadogg
DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantStar Contributorcronosmantas
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Registered: June 2, 2008
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Quoting GSyren:
Quote:
I basically take the approach "it is what it is".

Will I be better off knowing which of my old Warner discs are corrupt? They'll most likely be oop so I can't re-buy them anyway. If and when I pull out an old DVD to rewatch and find it to be corrupt, then I may start looking for a newer replacement, preferably on blu-ray.


This is totally going to be my approach. I panicked at first, but I can't live that way. I've been collecting DVDs and Blus since 2000 so naturally some are going to bite the dust. If I run into one that no longer works, I will just find a cheap newer DVD edition to replace it or a blu-ray
Never judge a movie by its sequel or remake
DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantStar Contributorscotthm
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Quoting cronosmantas:
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If I run into one that no longer works, I will just find a cheap newer DVD edition to replace it or a blu-ray

Sensible, but it's a bit disappointing when one sits down to watch a movie and it stops playing 2/3 of the way through.

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DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantStar Contributorscotthm
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Quoting AiAustria:
Quote:
This calculation is extremely optimistic:
- 8x12TB RAID-Z2 delivers a little bit more than 50TiB usable Space (80% usage limit, TB/TiB gap, RAID-Z2 overhead)

I figured on about 48 TB.

Quote:
- most of us around here collect discs because of the extras and presentation of the content; a compression to 1.2GB for a DVD and 6.2 GB for a BD is completely unrealistic

1.3 GB per DVD movie and 6.2 GB per BD movie is not only realistic but is the average size of the files on my Plex server.  I don't bother with ripping all the extra features.

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DVD Profiler Desktop and Mobile RegistrantStar ContributorDJ Doena
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Registered: March 14, 2007
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I know I'm going to get weird side glances for this, but here it goes.

Ripping my whole collection to disc is not worth the effort because most of the stuff I bought I will never watch again. 

There will be the occasional favorite that get played again from time to time but most movies I've seen once and enjoyed them / did not enjoy them but will probably never watch again.

There's just too much new stuff coming out every year to go back to most of the old stuff. According to my statistics I have a net play time of 854,255 minutes. That's 1 year 228 days 5 hours 35 minutes.

Even if many of the discs in these cases will never play again, I probably would not notice.

Why collect them then? Because movies and TV shows are my hobby. I bought them, I watched them and then I put them on the shelves. Bibliophilists, numismatists and philatelists do the same.

To spend money on hard drives, NASes and - as AiAustria pointed out - the electric bill is just not worth the risk of losing the ability to play one of these discs.
Karsten
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DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantStar ContributorGSyren
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Totally agree with DJ Doena.
Not to mention the time it would take to rip thousands of titles.
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DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantStar Contributorscotthm
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Quoting DJ Doena:
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There's just too much new stuff coming out every year to go back to most of the old stuff.

My habits are quite different.  I'd much rather revisit a title I liked than to watch something new that I'll forget about in a day or two.

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DVD Profiler Desktop and Mobile RegistrantStar ContributorDJ Doena
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Quoting scotthm:
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My habits are quite different.  I'd much rather revisit a title I liked than to watch something new that I'll forget about in a day or two.


I also often have to decide if I delve into the unknown or just pick the comfort food where I know what I'll get.

But with that philosophy how do you ever discover new stuff worthy of becoming a new favorite?
Karsten
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Quoting DJ Doena:
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But with that philosophy how do you ever discover new stuff worthy of becoming a new favorite?

I figure if it's worth my interest people will still be praising it in ten or fifteen years and maybe I'll give it a try.  I haven't even gotten around to watching Jaws or The Godfather yet.

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DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantStar ContributorSpikyCactus
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Quoting DJ Doena:
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I know I'm going to get weird side glances for this, but here it goes.

Ripping my whole collection to disc is not worth the effort because most of the stuff I bought I will never watch again. 

There will be the occasional favorite that get played again from time to time but most movies I've seen once and enjoyed them / did not enjoy them but will probably never watch again.

There's just too much new stuff coming out every year to go back to most of the old stuff. According to my statistics I have a net play time of 854,255 minutes. That's 1 year 228 days 5 hours 35 minutes.

Even if many of the discs in these cases will never play again, I probably would not notice.

Why collect them then? Because movies and TV shows are my hobby. I bought them, I watched them and then I put them on the shelves. Bibliophilists, numismatists and philatelists do the same.

To spend money on hard drives, NASes and - as AiAustria pointed out - the electric bill is just not worth the risk of losing the ability to play one of these discs.


Have to say I kind of agree with this.  It's rare that I watch something more than once.  And I know I buy discs at two to three times the rate that I watch them at, so the 'backlog' problem I have is getting worse as time goes buy. I would guess I've only watched about 10% of the discs I have.  There's something unsettling about measuring one's own mortality by the number of films and TV series I will never get around to watching!

The only exception to making additional copies of things is when I buy films digitally. Whenever I watch one of these I now use AnyStream to make a copy I can keep.  I just don't trust Amazon (or anyone else for that matter) to somehow remove my access to my digital films that I've bought to access.  I backup everything, including these digital copies, once a week to a separate hard drive on another computer (that's otherwise almost always switched off).  I have got a really old NAS (that I bought when I was a lot more interested in 'computer stuff' than I am now), but I just use that for music, so it can be accessed from a number of devices.
Do you ever find yourself striving for perfection with an almost worthless attempt at it?  Guttermouth "Lemon Water".  Also, I include in my Profiler database VHS tapes, audio DVDs, audio books (cassettes and CDs) and video games (disk based and digital), as well as films and TV I've bought digitally.  So I'm an anarchist, deal with it.  Just be thankful I don't include most of my records and CDs etc in it too; don't think I haven't been tempted...
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